Computer Arts Students place in design competition

Kelly Moore November 13, 2013 0
Computer Arts Students place in design competition

Elizabethtown College’s computer art students were recently recognized by The Mount Joy Chamber of Commerce. Professor Linda L. Eberly, adjunct professor and owner of Eberly Designs, had her students design a label for a commemorative wine the Chamber will sell during their 2014 anniversary year.

“I assigned the students the specifics. The committee looked at the initial designs presented and refined the project with more specific guidelines. The second round of options were critiqued and the winners were picked,” Eberly said. Students used Adobe Illustrator Vector Art to make a label that included both the logo of the Mount Joy Chamber of Commerce and a “Wizard of Oz” theme.

Earlier this week, the top three winners were chosen. They each received a gift certificate redeemable at more than a dozen Mount Joy restaurants and businesses, as well as a certificate of appreciation.

Junior Andrew Blank, a computer science major and art minor, received $50  for his winning label design. Senior Dina Dispensiere, communications major and creative writing minor, won $30 for second place. Senior Erika Klitsch, biology major and anthropology minor, received $20 for third place.

Blank is interested in adding the new graphic design minor if his schedule allows for it, and both Dispensiere and Klitsch said they would have added the graphic design minor if it were offered sooner in their college careers.

Members of the Chamber came to class Monday night to present the prizes and talk about the process. “It was a hard decision to pick just three. There were at least six options that would have been worthy of making into a label,” Kerry Meyers, chamber coordinator, said.

“We were impressed with the quality of work and liked pieces from each label design,” Leslie Houck, chamber board member and 75th anniversary committee member, said.

“The experience helped the students understand the ins and outs of working with a real client. They were able to work on a real project, not just an assignment for class,” Eberly said.

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